Master of Management  
 

Degrees / Courses

 
Curriculum Concentrations Courses Class Schedules Contact Us
Two Year Rotation of Courses (pdf)
 
Curriculum
A minimum of thirty-nine semester hours or thirteen courses comprise the Master of Management degree program. Of the thirteen courses, nine (9) courses are required and four courses are electives. A required course may be waived if the student's undergraduate or previous graduate preparation (current within the last five years) and/or current professional experience is determined to be the equivalent of that course. If a required course is waived, the student must select an additional elective course to replace the waived course. The four elective courses may be selected according to student interest to complete the minimum 39 semester hours of graduate credit. All courses are three semester credits each, with the exception of MG 699 which has variable credit hours.
 

Courses

Required Courses: Elective Courses:
MG 500 The Economic Environment
MG 510 Research Methods, Design, and Analysis*
MG 520 Organizational Behavior: Focus on the Individual*
MG 530 Marketing Management
MG 540 Organizational Theory and Design
MG 570 Ethics and Social Responsibility of Management
MG 580 Accounting for Management
MG 641 Managerial Presentation Skills   or   MG 646 Group Dynamics
MG 695 Strategic Management and Policy-Making** (16-weeks)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
* MG 510 and MG 520 should be taken within the first 9 credits.
**MG 695 should be taken within the last 6 credits of the program.
MG 641 Managerial Presentation Skills
MG 646 Group Dynamics
MG 648 Leadership
MG 649 Organization Development
MG 671 Industrial Ecology
MG 672 Sustainable Business Management
MG 673 Building Social Capital
MG 675 Human Resource Management
MG 685 Sales and Promotion Management
MG 686 Marketing for Non-Profit Organizations
MG 687 International Marketing
MG 689 Consumer Behavior
MG 690 Marketing Strategy
MG 694 Managing 21st Century Organizations
MG 697 Internship
MG 699 Independent Project/Independent Study
 
Course Descriptions:
MG 500 The Economic Environment
This is a course in Managerial Economics, which focuses primarily on the microeconomic environment in which a manager must operate.  Besides understanding how market structures affect firm performance, the course explores the use of economic concepts as managerial tools. 
 
MG 510 Research Methods, Design and Analysis
(To be taken within the first nine (9) credit hours)
A conceptual presentation of descriptive and inferential statistics and their use in decision making. The course involves research design, planning and evaluation research, problem selection, proposal writing and presentation, and research report writing and evaluation.
 
MG 520 Organizational Behavior: Focus on the Individual
(To be taken within the first nine (9) credit hours)
Individual factors affecting human behavior in organizations are explored in this course. Theoretical concepts which provide the foundation for the study of organizational behavior are examined together with an emphasis on leadership, team development, motivation, and communication. Application of these concepts to the management of organizations is accomplished through class activities. While the focus is almost entirely on the core organizational behavior topics, the development of a management philosophy and the understanding of the link between both managerial activities and organizational effectiveness are used as integrating themes.
 
MG 530 Marketing Management
Policy formation through marketing management is studied with special emphasis on the influence of marketing institutions, market structure, governmental regulations, and fluctuations in population and national income.
 
MG 540 Organizational Theory and Design
This course treats the organization as an entity for study, looking at such issues as the historical growth of organizations, organizations as reflections of society, organizational structure, mission, goals, culture, and politics. (Macro O.B.). Emphasis is given to the examination of the characteristics of open systems, studying models of organizations for their effectiveness, developing strategies for innovations and change within organizations.
 
MG 570 Ethics and Social Responsibility of Management
A study of the role and responsibilities that organizations have in their relationship to local, state, national, and international communities. Impact on economic, social, and cultural systems, and the ultimate influences an organization has on personal and social functioning are reviewed.
 
MG 580 Accounting for Management
An examination of techniques used in establishing standards and budgets for control with an overview of product costing and overhead applications. The course also includes the flow of accounting data in the creation of financial statements. Careful study is also given to the problems of making business decisions, budgeting and cost control, and using accounting data in planning operations and policy formulation.
 
MG604 Managing Health Care Organizations

This course provides an introduction to: The U.S. Healthcare Delivery System and its scope; An examination of the participants involved in the delivery and provision of healthcare services, including: ambulatory, acute, home health, long-term care, mental health, and public health services; An examination of the origin, development, structure, organization, and operational issues as they relate to hospitals and healthcare delivery systems; An examination of the supply and demand of health care services with an exploration of the roles of demography, socioeconomic status and disease frequency as they relate to access, quality and cost; An operational overview of the health care system including the internal structure and working relationships among health care managers, clinicians, independent physicians & ancillary services, and a review of efficiency, production and distribution of these health care services; The role of technology in the healthcare sector, informatics, and the transition to metrics-based decision-making, reimbursement and asset allocation; An exploration of recent trends in the healthcare sector, including costs and financing, the development and role of private insurance and managed care, the influence of governmental programs (Medicare and Medicaid), and the increased focus on Patient Safety, Quality Assurance & Outcomes Management; An examination of the challenges confronting healthcare and exploring the future direction of the HC industry.

 
MG605 Contemporary Issues in Health Care Law & Ethics
This course provides an introduction to: Historical and current legal issues in healthcare; Regulation of health care delivery and the impacts of the regulatory environment on the availability of services; The practical applications affecting operational decision-making; Malpractice / Liability Issues; Licensing and Regulation; Legal aspects of patient care; Healthcare Fraud and Abuse; Tort, Criminal & Civil aspects; Patient Rights; Biospecimin Ownership.
 
MG606 Financial Management for Health Care Administrators

The focus of this course is to provide a working knowledge of: The overall health care payment structure, including third-party reimbursement; The policies associated with insurance companies, reimbursement methodologies used in health care, and how they vary by payment source (governmental, private, and capitated insurance); Financial tactics and methodologies used by facilities and practitioners; The role of collections, credits & discounts; The budgeting process, working capital analysis and resource obligation; Costing methodologies, revenue cycle management, purchasing strategies, and variance analysis; Compensation Structures & time/patient Models.

 
MG607 Future Trends in Health Care

This course provides insight into emerging and future themes in the delivery, consumption and development of healthcare in the United States. The course will address complex issues and provide introductory insights into: how changing demographics will impact supply and demand of health care as well as shifting expectations of different generations; emerging role of technology in health care delivery and consumption; new care delivery models including decentralized versus centralized care; increasing access to clinical research and the drug development process; evidence based medicine including personalized and/or genetic driven medicine; shift in care providers including growing presence of family care and Dr. Nurses; implications of emerging trends on financial structures and regulation.  The course will include case studies of organizations that are early adopters and are on the leading edge of emerging trends.  

 
MG 641 Managerial Presentation Skills
This experiential course focuses on the individual development of skill building for public speaking. Specifically, emphasis is placed on creating effective speech content, conducting an audience analysis and speech critique, as well as understanding the causes and remedies of communication apprehension related to public presentation.  Instruction in vocal and physical delivery is provided in addition to ample feedback.
 
MG 646 Group Dynamics
A study of group process and functions, including theories of group and team dynamics, the major variables influencing group process, and specialized group techniques particularly applicable to organizational functioning.
 
MG 648 Leadership
A study of leadership research including leadership traits, styles, contingency theories, and group leadership approaches. Students apply these results through an analysis of their own personality traits and leadership styles. Prerequisite: MG 520 or MG 540 or equivalent.
 
MG 649 Organizational Development
The course focuses on a systematic approach to planned organizational change. Students discuss various ways of assessing the organization’s current status (strengths, weaknesses, needs, etc.), prescribing the appropriate changes, strategies and effective interventions, and planning ways to overcome resistance to change.
 
MG 660 Sustainable Economics and Management Decisions
Microeconomic theory and models of environmental economics are used to examine issues such as common property resources, externalities, environmental accounting, contingent valuation and maximum sustainable yield.  The models and theory are also used to evaluate the economic and social impacts of environmental policy, and management decisions. Prerequisite: MG 500
 
MG 671 Industrial Ecology
This course examines natural and anthropogenic production processes and examines the complex series of interactions among society, industry, and the natural environment. Numerous business case studies are discussed that significantly improve resource efficiency.
 
MG 672 Sustainable Business Management
This course focuses on successful techniques used by industrial designers and business managers to concurrently increase profits, eliminate waste and toxins, and increase human social capital, especially in the local community. The second part of the course includes a number of presentations by West Michigan business leaders who currently implement sustainable business practices in their companies. (Students should take MG671 prior to MG672.)
 
MG 673 Building Social Capital
This course examines the role of social capital in building organizations and communities that support sustainability. The key elements and various forms of social capital will be explored by looking at the different ways that communities develop and how the human relationship with ecological systems can be enhanced. In addition to theoretical foundations, both US and international business and community case studies will also be used as a  way to better understand how social structures. networks and norms help to strengthen the interdependencies among social capital, natural capital and commerce.
 
MG 685 Sales and Promotion Management
This course develops a detailed understanding of the various promotional tools such as advertising, personal selling, sales promotion, and publicity. Means of estimating costs and results are explored together with those perspectives useful in coordinating promotional objectives and efforts within the organization. Applications are developed to include the creation of promotional plans and budgets as well as the design of promotional efforts such as advertising campaigns and sales tactics, with an emphasis on legal and ethical guidelines. Prerequisite: MG 530 or equivalent.
 
MG 687 International Marketing
The course investigates marketing strategies and functions as they are adjusted for the international environment of the organization. Pricing and product design are evaluated in the context of currency fluctuations, differing cost patterns, and different economic and cultural determinants of demand. Promotion and physical distribution are investigated in the context of infrastructure capabilities, costs, and culturally determined expectations for performance. Integrative international marketing strategies are developed, utilizing an understanding of financial implications in various reference currencies as well as both classic and state-of-the-art concepts of appropriate international strategy.
 
MG 689 Consumer Behavior
A study of the factors which shape and influence the behavior of consumers in the marketplace. Both macro- and micro- consumer behavior aspects are reviewed, with major emphasis on contributions from the behavioral sciences, including such topics as sensation and perception, learning and motivation, attitude formations, and group influences on consumer behavior.
 
MG 690 Marketing Strategy
This course develops an understanding of the organization’s market niche through the integration of perspectives in psychology, consumer behavior, microeconomics, finance, ethics, law, and strategic management. Strategic options for the enhancement of the organization’s position are explored, utilizing applications which include market research, computer simulations, and case studies. Prerequisite: MG 530.
 
MG 694 Managing 21st Century Organizations
To provide managers with an overview of factors currently affecting both management and organizations together with their potential future effect on work and organizations.
 
MG 695 Strategic Management and Policy-Making (16-weeks)
(To be taken within the last six (6) credit hours of the program) This capstone course in the student’s program is intended to consolidate the information accumulated in earlier course work in order to demonstrate the interaction of all sub-functions of the organization. Students will be placed in real-world situations through the use of cases, simulation, and actual management circumstances, and will be expected to defend any recommended actions. (Prerequisite: MG500, MG510, MG520, MG530, MG540, MG570, MG580).
 
MG 697 Internship
(Students must have completed at least 21 credit hours) Up to three (3) elective credit hours may be earned through an internship in a new area of learning and directly related to a Master of Management study area. This internship is negotiated with a full-time faculty member with related experience in conjunction with the Career Services Department. On-site visits to observe the student will be utilized as part of the evaluation process. A field supervisor must also be identified. The student is responsible for finding an organizational setting and for identifying both the field supervisor and the Aquinas faculty member. The Career Services Department will assist in arranging an internship (paid or unpaid). Special registration forms must be completed before a student can be registered. The forms are available in the Career Services Office. Grading will be on a Credit/No Credit (Cr/NC) basis. Approval of the Director of Graduate Studies is required.
 
MG 699 Independent Project (Variable credit)
An individually negotiated project of a defined nature is established by a contract between the instructor and student. Approval of the Director of Graduate Management Programs is required.
 
MG 699 Independent Study
Required or elective courses may be taken by independent study. All independent studies must be contracted with a faculty member and approved by the Director of Graduate Management Programs. Forms are available in the Graduate Studies Office. Students are limited to two (2) independent studies or independent projects or combination, for a total not to exceed six (6) credit hours.