School of Education  
 

Introduction to Education - Resources

 
Field Placement Information
AQ SOE Portfolio
 
Professional Development Information:
PSMT (Professional Standards for Michigan Teachers) - Standards Text
PSMT (Professional Standards for Michigan Teachers) - Complete Matrix
Professional Organizations  
Michigan Learn Port website  
 
AQ Lesson Plan Format: Michigan K-12 Standards:
Lesson Plan Content
Michigan K-12 Curriculum Standards (main page)
Lesson Plan Template (Word) K-8 Grade-Level Content Expectations (GLCE's)
Model Lesson - Elementary (PDF) High School Content Expectations (HSCE's)
Model Lesson - Secondary (PDF)  
 
AQ SOE Portfolio:

As part of your certification preparation, you are required, over the next few years, to collect and organize evidence of your competence as an educator. This evidence or documentation will be presented in an electronic portfolio for final review before you are recommended for certification.

Although you are encouraged to begin building up evidence in all sections of your portfolio, the following items should be posted by the end of your Introduction to Education course experience:

  • Cover Letter or Introductory Page
  • Resume or Professional Vita
  • Field Placement Description, Photos*, and Reflections (optional)

* Check your exhibits for confidentiality. If you have used samples of assessments, student work, or anything that has individual names, addresses, phone numbers, school names, teacher names, etc., make sure you remove that information from the exhibit. Permission for use of any K-12 students' pictures verified and documented.

For more information, handouts, and links to sample portfolios, follow this link: AQ SOE Portfolio

 
Education Professional Organizations:

Michigan Council of Teachers of English (MCTE)
Michigan Council for the Social Studies (MCSS)
Michigan Council of Teachers of Mathematics (MCTM)
Michigan Science Teachers Association (MSTA)
Michigan Reading Association (MRA)
Michigan Art Education Organization (MAEA)
Michigan Association for Computer Users in Learning (MACUL)
Michigan Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (MITESOL)
Michigan Interscholastic Forensic Association (MIFA)
Michigan Music Educators Association (MMEA)
Michigan School Band and Orchestra Association (MSBOA)
Michigan School Vocal Music Association (MSVMA)
Michigan Association of Heath, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance (MAHPERD)
Michigan Council for Exceptional Children (MCEC)
Family and Consumer Science Educators of Michigan (FCSEM)
Michigan Speech-Language-Hearing Association (MSHA)

Michigan Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

Learning Disabilities Association of Michigan

 
Lesson Plan Content:

Michigan Curriculum Framework Content Standards and Benchmarks:

This is the section that identifies which Content Standards and Benchmarks are being taught during the lesson.  List the Strand, Standard, and Benchmark for each one being taught.

Unit Outcome:

State the unit outcome(s) to which this lesson is related. Identify the unit outcome from the KC4 curriculum, local school district documents or State of Michigan standards and benchmarks.

Lesson Outcomes:

Write the behavioral and instructional outcomes for this lesson in clear, concise, powerful statements which indicate exactly what all learners will know, do, and be like when the lesson is completed. Begin these statements with “The Learner Will ...” or “TLW.”

Rationale/Purpose for Lesson: This is a brief section explaining the importance of students achieving these outcomes and how this is relevant to real life contexts for students.

Assessment:

Show how you will determine and document (both formally and informally) that the outcomes of the lesson were accomplished. How will students demonstrate the skills, knowledge, and attitudes they have learned as a result of this lesson?

Resources/Materials Required:

List everything you will need to teach this lesson and, if possible, where materials may be obtained.

Introduction: Write a brief paragraph outlining how you will introduce this lesson in a way that will engage all learners’ attention and generate a “need to learn” within them. What is the “grabber” you will use to snap their heads around and focus them on the lesson?

This is also a time to activate prior knowledge, do some pre-assessment and inform students of the lesson outcomes and unit standards they will be working on and accomplishing with this lesson.

Procedures: Describe in detail what you will do to deliver the lesson and what the students will be doing to learn from it.

Procedures must:

  • Be clearly written, step-by-step processes
  • Be developmentally appropriate
  • Contain clear, detailed directions
  • Be logically organized
  • Use a multitude of strategies
  • Keep learners actively involved
  • Address learning styles, special needs, and cultural diversity
  • Use questioning techniques designed to increase learner responses
  • Include modeling - showing an example as you explain
  • Provide an estimated time frame for each of the activities listed
  • Guided Study: What additional independent practice will be employed to extend and continue the learning process?

Homework: (when appropriate)

What additional outside activities will be employed to extend and continue the learning process?

Homework is...

  • Meaningful work that can ONLY be done at home (classifying foods in the refrigerator as to food groups)
  • Practice work that can be done completely independently by the student without the need for help from anyone else.

Closure:

Explain how you will effectively bring this lesson to an end in such a way that learning is moved from short term memory to long term memory.  Describe how students will summarize their learning and engage in metacognition to build confidence in their own thinking abilities. How will students reflect emotionally on their learning and make connections to contexts in their own lives? How will you prepare and excite learners for the next step in the learning process? 

Evaluation and Reflection: (to be completed after the lesson has actually been taught)

Reflect on the experience of the lesson in terms of what you learned about the students and your own teaching performance. What went well? What needs to be changed? What improvements and personal development needs to occur for this lesson to be even more effective the next time?

 
Michigan Content Expectations/Common Core State Standards and Crosswalks

 

Mathematics

 

English Language Arts

 

Content Area Expectations