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  School of Education  
 

Graduate Programs and Course Descriptions

 
M.Ed. Program The Master in Education (M.Ed.) program is designed for individuals who have a Bachelor’s degree and wish to earn Michigan teacher certification. The M.Ed. program allows students to complete initial certification requirements and work on the master degree concurrently. Read more about the M.Ed. Program on the M.Ed. Overview page.
 
M.A.T. Program

The Master in the Art of Teaching (M.A.T.) program offers advanced studies for certified classroom teachers. Numerous program options are available that allow certified teachers to add endorsements to their teaching certificates, to attend classes that will count towards their professional certificates, or to earn a masters degree. Read more about the M.A.T. Program on the M.A.T. Overview page.

 
M.S.E. Program

The Master in Science Education (M.S.E.) is designed for certified teachers who wish to strengthen their competencies in the teaching of science at the elementary and middle school levels. Course instruction emphasizes content and models the methods of teaching and learning that are an integral part of the science classroom. M.S.E. classes are constructivist in nature, inquiry-driven, and project-based. Both the pedagogy and the content of each course are explored, discussed, and practiced. Read more about the M.S.E. Program on the M.S.E. Overview page.

 

Course Descriptions

Below is a list of all graduate Education courses offered at Aquinas College. Be aware that the following courses may not always be offered in the semesters indicated. Please use the following information as a guide to the approximate semesters these courses are scheduled to be offered. Not all courses are open to all M.Ed., M.A.T., and M.S.E. candidates; please read each course description carefully.

(TIP: Use ctrl-F to quickly “Find” and skip to a desired course number.)
 

Courses:

 

ED 560

Mathematics for Elementary & Middle School Teachers I (3) [Fall, Spring, Summer]

Topics appropriate for grades K-12 include measurement, geometry, logic and graphing, number patterns, number theory, elementary algebraic preparation, probability and statistics.  Emphasis is on constructing understanding through experience: exploring, extrapolating and explaining concepts and relationships.  Problem solving, both in groups and individually, is a major theme.  Required for Elementary Endorsement. 

Prerequisite: May be taken concurrently with EN 501

Special Note: Required for all elementary candidates. Students must prove algebra proficiency by either passing the AQ School of Education algebra proficiency test or have taken a college algebra class within the past three years and earned a grade of "C" or better.

 

 

ED 561

Mathematics for Elementary & Middle School Teachers II (3) [Fall, Spring, Summer]

Topics appropriate for grades K-8 include number patterns, number theory, elementary algebraic preparation, probability and statistics. Emphasis is on constructing understanding through experience: exploring, extrapolating and explaining concepts and relationships. Problem solving, both in groups and individually, is a major theme. Required for Elementary Endorsement.

Prerequisite: EN 501 and EN 560 ; may be taken concurrently with EN 571.

Special Note: Required for all elementary candidates.

 

 

ED 571

Mathematics Methods for Elementary and Middle School Teachers (3)
[Fall, Spring, Summer]

Examines the ways children learn and fail to learn mathematics, and emphasizes strategies for teaching and designing lessons.  New content focuses on concepts and operations of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals.  Tutoring and teaching field experiences required.

Field component: minimum 5 hours

Prerequisite: EN 501 and EN 560 ; may be taken concurrently with ED 561.

Special Note: Required for all elementary candidates.

 

 

EN 500

Practicum: Teaching Writing (3) [Fall and Spring]

This course introduces students to current theories about the teaching of writing, gives them practice as writers of expressive and expository writing, and provides them with practical strategies for teaching writing as a process in secondary classrooms.  Writing issues discussed include designing effective writing assignments, responding to student writing, prewriting strategies, grammar and writing, literature and writing, grading, and assessment.  The course also includes a field component in which students tutor first-year writing students at Aquinas College or work as tutors in a middle or high school classroom.

Field component: variable; typically minimum 20-25 hours

Prerequisite: EN 501 or admission to M.A.T. program

 

 

EN 501

Introduction to Education(3) [Fall and Spring; not available Summer]

Students will work in a K-12 school setting on a weekly basis, assisting children and serving as a teacher aide. A minimum of 40 contact hours over the course of the semester is required. Students will also attend a seminar, engaging in reading and writing assignments and class discussions. All field placement assignments will be limited to public and private schools in Kent County school districts. Observation fee of $125.

Field component: minimum 40 hours

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master in Education (M.Ed.) program; satisfactory background check status.

Special Note: EN 501 is the prerequisite for all M.Ed. graduate education courses unless approved by a School of Education advisor or noted otherwise. A student who has received an "F" in EN 501 will be restricted from taking any other education course until a passing grade has been earned.

 

 

EN 502

Educational Psychology

This course has been replaced by EN507 Human Growth and Schooling.

 

 

EN 504

Human Growth and Development

This course has been replaced by EN507 Human Growth and Schooling.

 

 

EN 506

Application of Learning Theories for the Elementary Classroom (3) [Fall, Spring and Summer]

Learners will apply learning theory to the production of a ten day unit plan including ten fully developed daily lesson plans with formative and summative and assessments and a comprehensive classroom management plan. Learners will also evaluate strategies used with elementary school students and complete various assignments that will enhance the learner’s understanding and knowledge of the elementary school student and educational programs appropriate for that student.

Field component: minimum 20 hours

Prerequisites (for M.Ed. students ): EN 501 and either EN507 or EN 502 or EN 504

Special Note: Required for elementary candidates only.

 

 

EN 507

Human Growth and Schooling (3) [Fall, Spring and Summer]

The content of this course includes (a) theories of human development and learning, according to, for example, Skinner, Piaget, Erikson, Kohlberg, Goleman, Vygotsky and brain development theorists [this course would not include personality theories], (b) preliminary applications of these theories in human contexts, especially classrooms, (c) the beginnings of strategies for classroom instruction based on these theories, and (d) a parent involvement module to promote student learning at home.

Field component: variable; minimum 2 class observations

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master in Education (M.Ed.) or the Masters in the Art of Teaching (M.A.T.) program. M.Ed students must also have completed EN 501 or may take EN 501 concurrently with this course.

Special note: Required course for all M.Ed. certification candidates.

 

 

EN 508

Curriculum, Assessment, and Management for Secondary Teachers (3)
[Fall, Spring and Summer]

Learners will apply learning theory to the production of a nine week unit plan including five fully developed daily lesson plans with formative and summative and assessments and a comprehensive classroom management plan. Learners will also evaluate strategies used with secondary school students and complete various assignments that will enhance the learner’s understanding and knowledge of the secondary school student and educational programs appropriate for that student.

Field component: minimum 20 hours

Prerequisites (for M.Ed. students ): EN 501 and either EN507 or EN 502 or EN 504

Special Note: Required for secondary candidates only.

 

 

EN 509

Foundations of Education (3) [Fall, Spring and Summer]

The important ideas and issues in America’s schools today are the product of their past.  This course will investigate these ideas and issues, particularly race, class, and gender relations in American society and their impact on public education.  The course will begin with an overview of underlying philosophy systems, proceed through historical crises in American cities and schools, and consider current reform proposals and projects.

Field component: 1 class observation

Prerequisites (for M.Ed. students ): EN 501, may be taken concurrently

 

 

EN 510
M.A.T.

Research Methods, Design and Analysis (3) [Fall, Spring and Summer]

A conceptual presentation of descriptive and inferential statistics and their use in decision making.  The course involves research design, planning and evaluation, problem selection, proposal writing and presentation, and research report writing and evaluation. Students will develop an understanding of the two major research paradigms, along with an understanding of the quantitative and qualitative research methods associated with those paradigms. Students will read, interpret, and evaluate research relevant to educational matters. Students will write a research proposal using a specific organizational format.

Prerequisite: Michigan Teacher Certification

Special note: M.A.T. core course. This course is taken just prior to EN 690: Master Teaching Project.

 

 

EN 510
M.Ed.

Research Methods, Design and Analysis (3) [Fall, Spring and Summer]

A conceptual presentation of descriptive and inferential statistics and their use in decision making.  The course involves research design, planning and evaluation, problem selection, proposal writing and presentation, and research report writing and evaluation. Students will develop an understanding of the two major research paradigms, along with an understanding of the quantitative and qualitative research methods associated with those paradigms. Students will read, interpret, and evaluate research relevant to educational matters. Students will write a research proposal using a specific organizational format.
Prerequisite: Michigan Teacher Certification

 

 

EN 515 

School Motivation and Discipline (3) [Summer]

Throughout pre- and in-service teacher training, questions concerning motivation and discipline rank high.  This course examines these concepts within the context of the United States’ diverse value systems and how those values interface with schools. Current theories are explored against the backdrop of how education developed within the western world and specifically in the United States.  Upon completion of this course, students should have an overview of where specific acts of discipline are leading, the potential consequences of employing them, and an array of discipline and motivation strategies and procedures.
Prerequisite: Michigan Teacher Certification

 

 

EN 520

Literacy I (3) [Fall, Spring and Summer]

This course provides a foundation for further work in the areas of reading and language arts. Students will gain an understanding of the reading process, acquire knowledge of the components of reading instruction, and explore strategies for teaching a diversified student population. (Previously titled Teaching Reading and Language Arts.)

Field component: 10 hours assisting in school setting (daytime)

Prerequisite: EN 501, may be taken concurrently (M.Ed. students); or admission to M.A.T. program

Special Note: Prerequisite for all reading courses. Required for elementary endorsement candidates.

 

 

EN 521

Curriculum Development in Early Childhood Education(3) [Fall and Spring]

Content and methods for planning and implementing developmentally appropriate activities and environments designed to enhance children's cognitive, social, emotional, physical, and creative development are explored. Developing an awareness of various forms of discrimination and identifying bias in materials, and methods of fostering respect and appreciation for cultural diversity are explored.  Inspired by the Reggio Emilia approach, an emergent negotiated curriculum process, promotion of meaningful family and community relationships and inclusion of children with special needs are addressed. Observation and participation in the field are required.

Field component: 10 hours

Prerequisite: EN 501 and EN 507 or EN 504

Special Note: Appropriate graduate education method elective for elementary candidates only; early elementary focus.

 

 

EN 524

Current Issues in Early Childhood Education (3) [Summer and Fall]

This course will focus on the identification and analysis of current issues in the early childhood field.  The analysis will include critical examination of efforts to deal with these issues.  Knowledge gained through this course will help prepare teachers to manage these issues as well as any which arise in the context of the teaching profession.

Every year this course will cover five current issues in early childhood education in the following: 1) research and theory regarding early care and learning environments for all children 2) family and community characteristics, 3) key public policy and its impact on young children and their families; 4) the new world of early childhood education, and 5) “New “ Best Practice"  in meeting the special needs of young children.

   

EN 525A

Philosophy of Education

This course has been replaced by EN 509 Foundations in Education.

 

 

EN 525B

History of Modern Education

This course has been replaced by EN 509 Foundations in Education.

 

 

EN 530 

Creative Experiences in Language Arts (3) [Spring 2010, Fall 2011; then Fall of odd years]

Emphasis in this course will be on a further exploration of the six language arts and the integration of those arts with the core curriculum. An application of techniques and strategies reflecting current research will be used to design classroom projects, and creative language arts experiences will ask students to engage in both process and product.

Prerequisite: M.Ed. students must have Michigan Teacher Certification

 

 

EN 531

Exploring the Reggio Emilia Approach (3) [Fall and Spring]

This course is an introduction and overview of the Reggio Emilia Approach that highlights fundamental principles regarding curriculum, child development, adult and child interactions, the environment as an educational value, and the theories and philosophy that are the foundation of this way of working. Discussion of these elements and how they may be used as a guide in exploring and adapting the Reggio Approach within the context of this culture are also tied to state curriculum objectives for educators and other guidelines such as NAEYC for children.

Field component: 20-30 hours

Prerequisite: EN 501 and EN 507 or EN 504 (M.Ed. students)

Special Note: Education advisor permission required. Appropriate graduate education method elective for elementary candidates only.

 

 

EN 540 

Literacy III (3) [Fall]

This course provides a focused look at teaching reading, including the reading strategies proficient readers use, the different frameworks for teaching reading, and how to promote robust vocabulary with your students. The course will also focus on the development of critical literacy skills for students. The course will promote an in-depth look at the teacher’s current practice as a video case study is built as a reflection tool focused on both prior and new ways to think about reading/literacy instruction.

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students), and EN 541

 

 

EN 541

Literacy II (3) [Fall, Spring, Summer]

This course is designed to present an introduction to informal assessment measures used by classroom teachers to assess literacy problems. Students will learn how to use assessment findings to implement research-based instructional strategies. Emphasis will be placed on the scoring and analysis of the test results, the remedial instructional strategies that would follow, and prevention measures currently utilized in elementary schools. Discussions will focus on effective research-based literacy methods and strategies that help young children become successful readers and writers. Students will also be introduced to formal literacy tests to become aware of the assessments used to diagnose students with special needs in their classroom. Each student will develop an individualized instructional plan for each assessment given based on the test results and analysis thereof.(Previously titled Techniques in Remedial Reading.)

Field component: 10 hours tutoring in AQ Elementary Reading Clinic (early evening)

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students) and EN 520

Special Note: Required for all elementary candidates.  

 

 

EN 543 

Linguistically and Culturally Responsive Teaching Practice  (3) [Fall]

This course is centered on the creation and implementation of effective literacy instruction for both linguistically and culturally diverse students. The course will combine lecture, small and large group discussion, collaborative projects, integration of diverse literature, and one-on-one tutoring in the field. The unity of theory and practice will also be a focus of discussion as well as reflection. . (Previously titled Literacy for the Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Learner.)

Prerequisite: EN 541.

 

 

EN 544 

Language Acquisition and Teaching  (3)

It is critical for our times that persons educated in the liberal arts be aware of the relationships between language and cognition as well as language and society.  Those directly involved in the education of young people must be acutely aware of their own language use as well as that of their students.  By raising linguistic concepts to the level of conscious awareness, greater tolerance and respect for diverse communication style is retained.  At the same time, individuals will be able to refine their own skills in the effective use of language and, finally, they will be able to develop methods of teaching that will enable students to use language with clarity and effectiveness. In this course students study acquisition and development of language as well as build an awareness of how the communication style is used and adjusted for day-to-day occasions. (Previously titled Language and Life.)

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students)

 

 

EN 545

Foundations of Early Childhood Education (3)
This course is designed to provide an overview of historical, philosophical, psychological, educational, and contemporary influences on the field of early childhood education. Students will explore historical antecedents and current research in early childhood education, the development of primary models of curriculum and pedagogy in the field, and the relationship between critical aspects of young children’s development and the creation of learning opportunities in the classroom.
The concept of developmentally appropriate practice and its application across different developmental levels and early childhood classrooms will be introduced. Issues in developing and implementing high quality early childhood education will be addressed, including the importance of family, culture, and community, the needs of diverse learners, the role of assessment in early learning, and the support of children’s emotional and social well being as essential components of the learning process.
Field component:  10 hours observation
Prerequisites: EN 501, EN 507, cumulative grade point average of 2.5 (M.Ed. students)
DHS Clearance, student background check.

 

 

EN 550

Methods in Social Studies (3) [Spring]

Strategies for organizing and teaching Social Studies in a creative, challenging, and compassionate manner.

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students)

Special Note: Graduate education method elective for elementary candidates. Also appropriate for secondary candidates with a major or minor in history, political science, geography or economics.

 

 

EN 553

Methods of Secondary Education (3) [Fall, Spring and Summer]

Study of approaches to secondary teaching; the adolescent phase of human development, listening, observing, and teaching skills. Field observations and microteaching in the subject area.

Field component: minimum 17 hours

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students)

Special Note: Required for all secondary candidates.

 

 

EN 554

Content Area Literacy (3) [Fall, Spring and Summer]

This course is the study of literacy in content material across the curriculum for students in grades 6–12. Strategies are presented that enhance student comprehension while reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and doing an activity within a discipline. There is a fieldwork component, working with secondary students who need assistance in literacy strategies.

Field component: 18 hours (early evenings)

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students) or admission to M.A.T. program

Special Note: Required for secondary candidates only.

 

 

EN 557

Introduction to Teaching English as a Second Language (3) [Fall and Spring]

Introduction to central English as a Second Language (ESL) theories, terminology and teaching methodologies and strategies for those new to the field of teaching ESL with an emphasis on specific issues concerning mainstream K – 12 teachers working with English language learners.  Links between theory and practice are made through a field component.  Course participants with an interest in teaching English as a foreign language or teaching foreign languages are welcome and will be accommodated. 

Field component: variable

Prerequisite: EN 501(M.Ed. students)

Special Note: Graduate education method elective for elementary and secondary candidates.

 

 

EN 558 

Advanced Methods and Materials of Teaching English as a Second Language (3) [Fall]

The course will have as its focus two important areas of English language teaching:  materials and methodology.  We will be evaluating various kinds of ESL instructional materials for English language learners and more closely examining methods for teaching English to speakers of other language with an emphasis on teacher techniques and strategies for teaching the four skills, grammar, pronunciation and vocabulary.

Prerequisite: EN 557

 

 

EN 559 

Assessment and Evaluation in English as a Second Language (3) [Spring]

Geared to understanding the processes for designing, analyzing and implementing assessment measures for English language learners with a focus on classroom-based evaluation and form of authentic assessment.  Links between assessment and instruction, examination of formal and informal types of formative and summative assessments and their value as feedback for teachers, parents and administrators are emphasized.  Field component provides participants opportunity to investigate various aspects of assessment of professional interest. 

Prerequisite: EN 557

 

 

EN 561 

Assessing Student Needs (3)

Learners will develop and defend a comprehensive assessment philosophy upon which all future assessment decisions and designs will depend. Students will include a critical analysis of assessment formats and relate each to their assessment philosophy for consistency. Students will critically analyze pencil and paper formats for assessment and design a fully developed authentic performance assessment complete with student directions and scoring rubrics as well as designing a proposal for a building or district wide portfolio assessment program.
Learners will also produce an assessment plan for a specified unit of instruction and supply a thorough description of the grading policies they will incorporate in their assessment plan. Learners will be regularly assigned Reaction and Reflection papers (five per semester) will focus on the consistent use of assessments as learning and how assessments can be used as important teaching tools. Alignment between standards, instruction and assessment is also emphasized in Reflection paper responses. Learners also describe their beliefs about assessment, supply a list of the assessment formats they will use in their teaching and explain and defend how they will determine grades for students. They will also provide a model of how they will set up their grade books for recording the results of assessment and describe how they will maintain communication with stakeholders regarding student achievement.

Field component: Required for individuals pursuing the Learning Disabilities Endorsement  

 

 

EN 562 

Special Education Curriculum and Methods (3) [Fall and Spring]

This course is designed to enhance students’ knowledge of currently used methods and curricula in special education settings. Students will develop IEP goals and plan instructional units based on assessment information. Emphasis will be placed on research-based teaching strategies, differentiated instruction, and Universal Design for Learning.

Field component: 2-5 hours

Prerequisite: EN 579 Inclusion I

 

 

EN 564 

Learning Disabilities: Theory to Practice (3) [Fall and Spring]

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of learning disabilities as related to historical foundations, legislation, causes, characteristics, identification, and service options. Students will also learn about instructional strategies and practices for students with reading, writing, and math disabilities.

Field component: 1-5 hours

Prerequisite: EN 579 Inclusion I

 

 

EN 566 

Classroom Management  (3) [Fall, Spring, and Summer]

Education Method elective for elementary and secondary candidates; requirement for learning disabilities endorsement.  This course is designed to equip teachers with a variety of strategies for responding to behavioral management issues in the classroom. Teachers will be given a variety of tools that can be used to individualize classroom discipline and best meet the needs of diverse learners. 

Field component: 10 hours

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students)

 

 

EN 568 

Elementary Practicum in LD (4) [Fall, Spring, and Summer]

A supervised, structured assignment in an elementary learning disability classroom setting.  The student is required to demonstrate ability to assess needs, plan and implement instruction and evaluate the effectiveness of their instruction. 

Prerequisite: All other LD coursework.

 

 

EN 569 

Secondary Practicum in LD (4) [Fall, Spring, and Summer]

A supervised, structured assignment in an secondary learning disability classroom setting. The student is required to demonstrate ability to assess needs, plan and implement instruction and evaluate the effectiveness of their instruction. Prerequisite: All other LD coursework.

 

 

EN 572

Art for Elementary Teachers (3) [Fall]

Specifically designed for the teacher who has little or no art knowledge or experience.  Structured as a series of studio projects designed to expose the student to a variety of art materials and the basic elements of art.  An art experience through the eyes of the artist.  A series of required readings will introduce methodology used in teaching art and outline stages of child development as it relates to visual art.  Lectures and discussions will focus on developing appropriate studio projects for the elementary level.

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students)

Special Note: Graduate education method elective for elementary candidates only. Also appropriate graduate education method elective for secondary art K-12 majors.

 

 

EN 575

Methods of Teaching Secondary Mathematics (3) [Spring of even years]

Provides a detailed examination of the pedagogy for teaching some specific areas of mathematics and of appropriate instructional strategies and techniques.  Students will be required to design and teach a unit which exemplifies the above.  Focus on the individual learner.

Field component: minimum 5 hours

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students)

Special Note: Required by the Mathematics Department for anyone preparing to teach mathematics in grades 6 through 12.

 

 

EN 576

Second Language Acquisition (3) [Fall]

An introduction to the subject of second language acquisition (SLA) and learning.  The prime objective of the course is to help educators better understand how people learn (or don’t learn) languages as well as to examine the complex issues surrounding SLA in educational contexts.  The course provides participants with opportunities to analyze the processes of child and adult SLA, how they differ from first language acquisition, the various personal, social and political factors that affect language learning, and the implications for teaching. 

 

 

EN 579 

Inclusion I (3) [Fall, Spring and Summer]

Inclusive education begins with the philosophy behind education and the emergence of an inclusive educational approach to students with disabilities in the general education classroom. Appropriate instructional objectives will be examined that fit children and adolescents in an inclusive educational setting. Adaptations to the general education curriculum will be assessed and matched with the academic, social/emotional, physical and behavioral needs of the child or adolescent. The maintenance of conditions and strategies for suitable instruction will be linked to the learning goals of the individual student. The ability of the general education teacher to function as a member of the IEP team will be stressed in light of other important relationships such as those with parents, paraeducators and other teachers.

Field component: minimum 2 hours

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students)

Special Note: Graduate education method elective for elementary and secondary candidates.

 

 

EN 581 

Science for the Classroom Teacher(3) [Summer]

This course emphasizes the practical aspects of teaching science using inquiry based constructivist approaches. It utilizes the Michigan Curriculum Framework of Benchmarks and Standards in all of the core science content areas of Life Science, Physical Science and Earth and Space Science. Science concepts, scientific methods and process skills will be analyzed and incorporated into daily lesson planning activities.  This class is operated in conjunction with the Aquinas College Science Camp for students in grades 4 through 6 during the summer semester.

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students)

Special Note: Required for elementary integrated science majors; graduate education method elective for elementary candidates; appropriate graduate education method elective for secondary biology, chemistry or physics majors/minors.

 

 

EN 585 

Music for Elementary Teachers (3) [Spring]

Specifically designed for the person with little or no experience in music.  Objectives are to supply a basic knowledge of general music suited for use in the elementary classroom and to give a working knowledge of available methods and materials.

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students)

Special Note: Graduate education method elective for elementary candidates only.

 

 

EN 588 

Youth Literature (3) [Fall and Spring]

This course reviews techniques and principles in the selection, evaluation, and promotion of young adult literature; it also introduces students to strategies for teaching literature.

Prerequisite: admission to M.A.T. program

 

 

EN 592 

Multicultural Issues in Education (3) [Fall, Spring, and Summer]

Multicultural Education provides a comprehensive overview of the theory and practice of multicultural education. Emphasis is given to valuing diversity, and applying multicultural anti-bias global perspectives. This course offers the opportunity for a lively discussion of controversial topics such as classicism, racism, sexism, and discrimination based on abilities, religion, language, and age.

Field component: variable hours

Prerequisite: Admission to M.Ed. or current teaching certification

Special Note: Required for all certification candidates.

 

 

EN 595 

Directed Student Teaching, Elementary School (12) [Fall and Spring]

Directed Student Teaching is the culmination of the teacher preparation program at Aquinas College . This is a minimum fourteen-week internship in a local elementary school under the direct supervision of an experienced certified teacher. Directed Student Teaching is a full-time experience. Attendance at seminars and completion of weekly journal writing and assigned readings are required.

Prerequisite: minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 and completion of all education, major, minor and general education coursework requirements. All coursework taken prior to application must be successfully completed with grades of "C" or higher by the application due date.

Low grades or grades of "Incomplete" or "No Credit" in required classes will result in denial of the application.

See the Student Teaching web page for further information regarding directed student teaching.

 

 

EN 596 

School and Culture in the 21st Century  (3) [Fall OR Spring]

Through the lenses of literature, theory, and narrative, this course analyzes public education in the United States along with the issues of a global society, as a way of informing and empowering teachers toward a stance of production and as agents of change.  Components of that context include multiple perspectives of theoretical, cultural, political and economic forces.  Using a multicultural critique as a foundation, the course investigates the effects on schools of changes in social stratification, especially poverty, as well as racial and ethnic demographics.  In addition, the course investigates the disparities of wealth and basic human needs existing in the world today.  Pre-service and practicing teachers should understand, in the age of a global economy, the needs and demands of not only their local students, but students around the world, and how each affects the other.   (Previously titled School and Society.)

 

 

EN 598 

Directed Student Teaching, Secondary School (12) [Fall and Spring]

Directed Student Teaching is the culmination of the teacher preparation program at Aquinas College . This is a minimum fourteen-week internship in a local elementary school under the direct supervision of an experienced certified teacher. Directed Student Teaching is a full-time experience. Attendance at seminars and completion of weekly journal writing and assigned readings are required.

Prerequisite: minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 and completion of all education, major, minor and general education coursework requirements. All coursework taken prior to application must be successfully completed with grades of "C" or higher by the application due date.

Low grades or grades of "Incomplete" or "F" in required classes will result in denial of the application.

See the Student Teaching web page for further information regarding directed student teaching.

 

 

EN 599 

Topical Issues in Education/Practicum (variable credits)

Generic course number used for variable offerings. Contact MAT Advisor for information.

 

 

EN 610

Inquiry-Based Literacy and Differentiated Instruction (3) [Spring]

This course provides an in-depth study in the domains addressed in diagnostic assessment and the principles and practices of diagnosis and remediation of reading disabilities and differentiated instruction.  In consultation and collaboration with a reading specialist, special education teacher, school psychologist, literacy coach, or related personnel who have the responsibility for providing literacy support, students will examine, administer, and/or compile a variety of formal and informal diagnostic tools used with individuals with reading difficulties.  These will be suitable to their certification levels and endorsements and will include the following: interest inventories, English language learning screening tools, visual and auditory discrimination tools, language expression and processing screening, phonemics, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, spelling, and writing assessment tools.  Students will analyze diagnostic profiles of struggling readers and examine various research-based reading intervention programs designed to match varied degrees of reading difficulty.   Students will be required to complete 30 hours of field experiences in a classroom setting and in collaboration with parents. They will be involved in implementing a reading intervention focused on instructional strategies that help students develop learning strategies.

Prerequisite: Michigan Teacher Certification

 

Field component: 30 hours

 

Note:  This course meets the State reading requirement for professional certification.  Please contact the Certification Officer at (616) 632-2436 with any questions.

 

 

EN 620 

Infant & Toddler Education (4) [Fall]

In-depth study of planning and providing developmentally appropriate programs for infants and toddlers. With focus on child development research for children from birth to age three, interactions between children and caregivers in a group setting, evaluation of learning materials, planning for emotional, social, intellectual and physical growth, communicating between staff and parents’ activities, licensing requirements, and the environments are explored. Emphasis are placed on relationship based approach and the role of the family. Current issues in infant and toddler including brain development, and infant mental health are addressed.  Active observation and participation in infant and toddler programs are required.

Field component: 40 hours of developmental study of young children in an accredited and constructivist infant/toddler setting.

Prerequisite: EN 501, and EN 507(M.Ed. students)

 

 

EN 621 

Curriculum Development in Early Childhood Administration (3) [Spring]

Content and methods for planning and implementing developmentally appropriate activities and environments designed to enhance children's cognitive, social, emotional, physical, and creative development are explored. Developing an awareness of various forms of discrimination and identifying bias in materials, and methods of fostering respect and appreciation for cultural diversity are explored.  Inspired by the Reggio Emilia approach, an emergent negotiated curriculum process, promotion of meaningful family and community relationships and inclusion of children with special needs are addressed. Observation and participation in the field are required.

Field component: 10 hours

Prerequisite: EN 501 and EN 507 (M.Ed. students) and EN 521 and EN 620

 

 

EN 630 

EdTech: Integrating Technology into the Classroom (3) [Fall, Spring, Summer]

This semester-long course, focuses on integrating technology into K-12 classrooms, is offered in a fully-online format. Topics covered include K-12 technology standards, technology-rich lesson planning based on Michigan GLCEs and/or HSCEs, Inspiration, PowerPoint, assistive technology, and the creation of an online WebQuest project. Education students taking this course benefit not only from the opportunity to explore current educational technology topics, but also experience online learning first-hand. The graduate research project provides an opportunity for teachers to research and apply current best-practices to their grade level and content area.

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students) or current teaching certification

Special Note: Graduate education method elective strongly recommended for elementary and secondary candidates. The Michigan Department of Education expects all teachers to be proficient in the use of technology and computers in the classroom.

 

 

EN 631 

EdTech: Web Authoring & Online Learning (3) [Fall or Spring]

This course provides exposure to and practice with Internet tools and resources which support K-12 learning. Course activities develop participants’ knowledge and understanding of pedagogical issues as they relate to teaching and learning in the online environment, and the development of quality online teaching and learning experiences. Topics covered include web authoring (Dreamweaver), online discussions, blogging, podcasting, wikis, chat rooms, and basic scripting. By the end of the course, students will create and teach an online lesson. Although basic computer skills and knowledge of the Internet are helpful, this course is appropriate for beginning to advanced Internet users.

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students) or current teaching certification

Special Note: Graduate education method elective strongly recommended for elementary and secondary candidates. The Michigan Department of Education expects all teachers to be proficient in the use of technology and computers in the classroom.

 

 

EN 632

EdTech: MS Office in the Classroom (3) [Fall or Spring]

Offered in a hybrid (blended) format, this course develops participant’s personal knowledge-base and skills related to MS Office productivity software (Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and Access). Project work addresses both teacher and student productivity, demonstrating how these tools can be used to enhance both teaching and learning. Topics covered include word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, database reporting, and keyboarding tutorial software. Course activities focus on practical classroom applications such as photo seating charts, labels, signs, flashcards, timelines, currency conversion tables, charts/graphs, mailing labels, and interactive PowerPoint games. The graduate research project provides teachers with the opportunity to research a topic of their choosing and then develop an implementation plan making effective use of these MS Office tools.

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students) or current teaching certification

 

 

EN 633

EdTech: Digital Multimedia (3) [Fall or Spring]

This course, offered in a hybrid (blended) format, prepares teachers to use digital images in the classroom effectively. Through a combination of hands-on activities, instructor presentations, readings, and independent project work, participants will learn how digital images can be used to support both teaching and learning in K-12 classrooms. Topics covered include video and digital camera equipment, image editing, storyboarding, web publishing, and reflective documentation. Access to digital camera equipment is required. Please see Media Center (AQ Library) if you do not have one.

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students) or current teaching certification

 

 

EN 635

EdTech: Leadership Strategies for Educators (3) [Summer]

 

This course prepares classroom teachers to be technology leaders within their schools. Participants will develop the skills and knowledge necessary to work with technical support staff, administrators, and fellow teachers to address the goals of their district’s curriculum and technology plans. Readings, course work, and hands-on projects will provide opportunities to learn about hardware, software, networking, and other forms of digital technology. Legal and ethical issues as well as practical procedures such as developing Request for Proposals and cost/benefit analysis will be addressed. Course topics, from basic troubleshooting to peer coaching, will prepare educators to model and mentor the effective use of educational technology. Hardware and networking experience is not required, although basic familiarity with computers is presumed.
Prerequisite: for MAT students only

 

 

EN 641

Advanced Literacy Assessment and Intervention (3) [Fall, Spring, and Summer]

This course examines research and advanced theories used in the development and use of diagnostic literacy assessment instruments and instructional methods useful in working with K-12 struggling readers and writers. Students will develop an understanding of informal and formal assessment procedures in the diagnostic and intervention process, and they will attain competence in determining literacy strengths and weaknesses using informal assessment techniques. Additionally, each student will develop and implement an intervention plan based on the results of the assessment measures used. Other critical areas to be addressed include test bias, validity, interpretation of data, and report writing.  Students will participate in the Elementary Reading Clinic to assess and tutor a student who struggles in some area(s) of literacy.

Field component:  20 hours tutoring in Elementary Reading Clinic (early evening)

Prerequisite:  EN 541

 

 

EN 643 

Reading Practicum  (3) [Any semester, arranged]

This course is a practicum intending to provide experience with the responsibilities of a reading teacher/reading specialist.  The practicum will consist of the development and implementation of a literacy-related project at a school (or some other agency) and supervisory experience in either the Elementary Reading Clinic or the Secondary Reading Clinic.  Projects and clinic experiences will be arranged individually with the instructor.

Field component:  variable

Prerequisite: EN 641 and EN 655 ; MAT students only

 

 

EN 645

Early Intervention (3)
This course offers the candidate an opportunity to know about and to understand early childhood students with exceptional needs. An exploration of etiology and developmental characteristics of young children will exceptional needs will frame the study. All categories of exceptionality will be surveyed, including anomalies such as social/emotional, communication delays, communicable diseases and attention deficit disorder. Candidates will study children with developmental delays or disabilities, children whose families are culturally and linguistically diverse, children from diverse socioeconomic groups, and other children with individual learning styles, strengths and needs. Emphasis will focus on the ability to possess key information.
This course will also focus on the tools of assessment and methods of referral for young children with disabilities, with an emphasis on the goals and benefits of assessment. IFSP, IEP, early intervention, and legal issues surrounding these topics will be featured. Active observation and participation in Early Childhood Special Education classrooms are required.
Field component: 20 hours in an Early Childhood Special Education classroom
Prerequisites: EN 501, EN 207, EN 620 (M.Ed. students)
DHS Clearance, student background check

 

 

EN 655

Adolescent Literacy (3) [Fall and Spring]

This course focuses on adolescent literacy, specifically the reading, writing, and thinking abilities of students in grades 6-12.  Topics will include motivation, out-of-school literacy practices of adolescents, popular culture and its influence on adolescent learning, and strategies to work with adolescent learners, especially those who struggle with reading and writing.  Participants will reflect on their own experiences as adolescents, learn about ideas to motivate adolescents, review research on adolescent literacy, and participate in the Secondary Reading Clinic in order to directly apply the course information in a tutoring situation.

Field component:  18 hours tutoring in Secondary Reading Clinic (evening)

Prerequisite:  EN 541 ; MAT students only

 

 

EN 658

Literacy Programs:  Organization & Management K – 12 (3) [Fall of even years]

This course focuses on the role of a reading specialist in the organization and management of K-12 school and district literacy programs.  Students in this course will analyze existing programs, considering research-based best practices in curriculum, instruction, and assessment, and make various recommendations for improvement and/or change.  Finally, ways in which the community can support and be an integral part of a literacy program will also be examined.   Current views, insights, and information about the management of literacy programs will be addressed.

Prerequisite:  EN 541 ; MAT students only

 

 

EN 663 

Leadership in Literacy  (3) [Spring of odd years]

This course focuses on leadership in literacy, specifically relating to effective professional staff development at a variety of levels, effective ways in which to help teachers and students succeed based on current research, and how to effectively organize for change in literacy.  The changing roles of reading specialists will be discussed, including the recent issues of literacy coaches.   Participants will create a professional staff development plan relating to literacy in the context of their own district and/or school, participate in the state reading conference, and develop a position paper on the role of a reading specialist/literacy coach. (Previously titled Reading Internship.)

Prerequisite: EN 541; MAT students only

 

 

EN 665

Inclusion II (3) [Fall and Spring]

This course focuses on how to create productive learning environments for student with diverse learning needs. An emphasis will be placed on collaboration and teaming among special and general education teachers as well as other school personnel. Additional topics include Child Study Teams, team-teaching models, working with paraeducators, and working with families.

Field component: 3-6 hours.

Prerequisite: EN 579 Inclusion I; for MAT students only

 

 

EN 682 

Children’s Literature (3) [Fall and Spring]

This course involves reading in all areas of children’s literature. Students will develop criteria for selecting books for children and skills to bring children and books together. Some work in storytelling and creative dramatics will be included as well as the development of projects to promote children’s books. Research into an area of interest in the field is required, as well as demonstration of leadership in promoting knowledge and use of children’s literature in the elementary school curriculum.

Field component: 1 read aloud in a classroom/library visit (daytime)

Prerequisite: admission to M.A.T. program

 

 

EN 690 

Master Teaching Project (3) [Fall and Spring]

The goal is for each student to bring together what s/he has learned formally and experientially into a focused project. It will synthesize the relevant theories and practices s/he has come to know into a project that celebrates these understandings. Each project will include an extensive bibliography that reviews the relevant work of others as it applies to the project, a clear professional description of the project, its implementation, results, conclusions drawn from the project and suggestions for next steps.
Prerequisite: for MAT students only

 

 

EN 691 

Early Childhood Practicum (3) credits [Fall, Spring, and Summer]

A supervised and evaluated student teaching experience totaling at least 300 clock hours in at least two different settings, serving children of two different settings (pre-school or after school (K-3) classrooms).
Prerequisite: for MAT students only

 

Field Placement: 160 hours

 

 

EN 695 

Teaching Creative Writing (3) [Fall]

The course is designed around the concept of “teacher as writer.” Students will develop writing portfolios of their own creative works to serve as models for their potential students. Creative writing lessons will be developed and implemented.

Field component: minimum 2 hours

Prerequisite: EN 501 or admission to M.A.T. program

Special Note: Graduate education method elective for elementary candidates. Appropriate for all candidates with a major or minor in English.

 

 

EN 696 

Topics in Teaching with Literature (3) [Spring of even years]

This course is intended to enable experienced teachers to teach literature either as a subject in its own right, or as an integrated component of another area of the curriculum such as art, music, drama, writing, history, social studies, religion, etc. In this course the term literature is defined as a writing of excellence, expressing ideas of lasting and universal interest.
Prerequisite: for MAT students only

 

 

EN 697 

Extended Reading Project (3)

This is an independent study course that allows a student to negotiate with and carry out, under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member, an in-depth, focused set of readings, a research project or a field of study. The student is expected to meet the M.A.T. minimum course requirements for reading, writing, research and field components or their equivalents.
Prerequisite: for MAT students only

 

 

EN 699 

Independent Project (variable credits)

Individually negotiated project of defined nature established by contract between instructor and student. Number of credits arranged.
Prerequisite: for MAT students only

 

 

EN 705 

Spanish/English Linguistics (3)

Examination of major phonetic, morphological, and syntactic differences between Spanish and English.  The history of Spanish dialectical differences among various Spanish-speaking regions, and practical implications of linguistic knowledge are studied. 

Prerequisite: SH 301 or equivalent proficiency; for MAT students only

 

 

EN 763 

Latin American Culture and Civilization (3)

Political and social institutions, education, art, architecture, literature and music from pre-Colombian periods to present; contemporary problems and everyday life. Course is conducted in Spanish. Assessment of Spanish reading/writing skills.

Prerequisite: SH 301 or equivalent proficiency; for MAT students only

 

 

EN 767 

The Hispanic in the U.S. (3) [Fall]

Major Hispanic groups, key geographic areas including Southwest and selected urban areas. The migrant stream, process of assimilation and acculturation, biculturalism, dynamics of intercultural interaction within Hispanic communities.

Prerequisite: EN 501 (M.Ed. students) or current teaching certification

Special Note: Education advisor permission required. Graduate education method elective for elementary and secondary candidates.

 

 

EN 771 

Theories of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism (3) [Spring]

This is an introductory course to bilingual/multi-lingual and English language education with an emphasis on the theories and practices underpinning bilingual programs and the teaching and learning of English language learners. The course provides an overview of the field, including the main concepts of bilingualism, and different models of bilingual and ESL programs. A main component of the course will be to examine peoples’ beliefs and experiences of becoming bilingual. Another component will center on specific educational issues that affects bilingual development in a school setting. The field experiences of this course will act as cohesive ties between what we explore, study and experiment with in course readings and discussions and the real world of bilingual/multilingual learners and teachers.
Prerequisite: for MAT students only

 

 

EN 794 

Practicum in ESL/Bilingual Education (3) [Fall, Spring, and Sumemr]

Field placement in bilingual or ESL classroom under the supervision of a certified bilingual or ESL teacher. Assessment of all language skills.

Field Component: minimum 30 hours
Prerequisite:
All required bilingual education coursework; for MAT students only

 

 

EN 896 

Teaching Foreign Language in the Elementary School (3 ) [Fall]

The goal of this course is to explore how the following components and aspects are applied to the teaching of foreign languages at the elementary and middle school levels:  theories and methods; historical influences and current status of foreign language teaching; standards for foreign language learning developed by ACTFL; curriculum design and development; linguistic and pedagogical foundations; integration of culture in the foreign language classroom; and use of technology to support foreign language learning.  To apply instructional concepts, students will participate in both individual and group planning and implementation of lessons and unit plans.  In addition, they will learn to relate their foreign language classroom observations in the field to the concepts they are studying in class. 

Prerequisite: proficiency in the foreign language at the advanced level (301 level course or equivalent); EN 501

Special Note: M.A.T. candidates or foreign language majors only. Required for elementary certification in foreign language. Also required for all students seeking K-12 teacher certification in French, German, or Spanish. This is an education methodology course and does not count toward the foreign language major.

 

 

EN 897 

Teaching Foreign Language in the Secondary School (3 ) [Spring]

Future foreign language teachers study current language acquisition theories and practical applications to the secondary classroom.  Important components of this course are the opportunities to observe and/or serve as an aide in a foreign language classroom, to prepare mini-lessons to present to fellow students, and to build a resource notebook to be used in future teaching positions.  Students will learn the meaning of belonging to a worthwhile profession and will compile many useful resources for their career.

Prerequisite: proficiency in the foreign language at the advanced level (301 level course or equivalent); EN 501 (M.Ed. students) or current teaching certification

Special Note: M.A.T. candidates or foreign language majors only. Required for secondary certification in foreign language. Also required for all students seeking K-12 teacher certification in French, German, or Spanish. This is an education methodology course and does not count toward the foreign language major.

 

 

MG 639 

Interpersonal Communication (3)

An overview of fundamental interpersonal concepts, principles, theories, and skills as they operate in organizations. The fundamental goal of the course is for the student to gain a fairly sophisticated understanding, based on landmark and more recent research and/or theoretical sources together with observation of and participation in dyadic role-playing events, of some of the critical variables in the process of interpersonal communication.

 

 

MG 641 

Managerial Presentation Skills (3)

A study of speech communication, the course focuses on the development of basic skills for effective speaking in the work setting. Students study the fundamentals of speaking to an audience, including voice, movement, organization, composition, and audience analysis, and receive practical experience in presenting various types of organizational speeches and presentations.

 

 

MSE 530  

Geosphere (3)

Concepts presented are necessary to understanding how the earth works as an active planet, and how this knowledge is crucial to our lives; for example, the influence of geology on the very existence of life on earth, the dependence of all human civilizations on rocks and minerals, the limits on the earth’s resources, and the fragile nature of the earth’s environments in which we live.  The course is based on long-range collaborative projects.

 

 

MSE 540

Motion, Forces, and Energy (3)

This course is concerned with motion, forces and momentum, work and energy.  The meaning and application of Newton’s Laws will be explored.  Students will participate in activities that demonstrate how these fundamental laws of physics apply to many everyday activities.  Classes follow a “workshop” format which combines lecture, laboratory, group activities, and the opportunity for students to construct physical concepts in their own way.

 

 

MSE 550 

Astronomy (3)

Earth’s view of the sky.  Emphasis is placed on how astronomers understand cosmic phenomena through the analysis of light, the application of known laws of physics, and the use of logic and experiment.  Students construct solar-system models to enhance their understanding and make sky observations with both the naked eye and telescopes.  Use of the Baldwin Observatory is anticipated.  Current theories of the beginning and development of the universe are explored.

 

 

MSE 611

Cell Structure and Function (3)

This is a course for certified teachers to strengthen competencies in the teaching of Science at elementary and middle school levels. This course will emphasize science content and model science teaching methods. Learning in this course is constructive, inquiry-driven, and project-based. Participants will work in small groups, perform investigations, discuss concepts and results, keep journals, utilize technology such as the internet, CD-ROMS, DVD’s, as well as learn how to effectively utilize inexpensive, readily available materials and explore local resources.
All course objectives are aligned with the Michigan Core Curriculum standards and benchmarks and teachers will learn those methods needed to prepare students for success in learning science, excelling in state prepared assessment instruments, and pursuing technological and scientific careers.
Specifically, the course content will encompass studying the cell as a living system. Heredity and genetics are studied including reproduction, mitosis, meiosis, chromosomes, genes, and dominant and recessive traits.  Mendel’s laws of biological heredity are analyzed.  A review of molecular biology featuring the functions of DNA and RNA in transmitting the genetic code is presented.   

 

 

MSE 613 

Organismal Diversity and Function (3)

This is a course for certified teachers to strengthen competencies in the teaching of Science at elementary and middle school levels. This course will emphasize science content and model science teaching methods. Learning in this course is constructive, inquiry-driven, and project-based. Participants will work in small groups, perform investigations, discuss concepts and results, keep journals, utilize technology such as the internet, CD-ROMS, DVD’s, as well as learn how to effectively utilize inexpensive, readily available materials and explore local resources.
All course objectives are aligned with the Michigan Core Curriculum standards and benchmarks and teachers will learn those methods needed to prepare students for success in learning science, excelling in state prepared assessment instruments, and pursuing technological and scientific careers.
Specifically, the course content will encompass studying specialization and organization of cells into plant and animal organisms, characteristics of plant and animal groups, and the structure and functions of cells, tissues, organs, and systems of plants and animals. Hands-on problem-solving activities are utilized together with the ethical and appropriate care of living organisms.  The course includes dissections, pond study and possible visits to John Ball Zoological Garden.
The diversity and components of the plant kingdom, from mosses and algae to ferns and flowering plants, will be studied in this course.  Students will make discoveries about plants through hands-on labs where they will examine whole plants and plant anatomy.  Comparisons of plant growth will be accomplished by manipulating different environmental conditions, including soil, nutrient, and light qualities.  Some classes may be held at John Ball Zoological Garden and the Frederik Meijer Botanical Gardens where students will learn how to use these facilities as a classroom resource.

 

 

MSE 616 

Evolution and Ecology (3)

This is a course for certified teachers to strengthen competencies in the teaching of Science at elementary and middle school levels. This course will emphasize science content and model science teaching methods. Learning in this course is constructive, inquiry-driven, and project-based. Participants will work in small groups, perform investigations, discuss concepts and results, keep journals, utilize technology such as the internet, CD-ROMS, DVD’s, as well as learn how to effectively utilize inexpensive, readily available materials and explore local resources.
All course objectives are aligned with the Michigan Core Curriculum standards and benchmarks and teachers will learn those methods needed to prepare students for success in learning science, excelling in state prepared assessment instruments, and pursuing technological and scientific careers.
Ecosystems are investigated to examine the interdependency and interrelationships between living and non-living components.  Analysis of food webs and how energy flows through an ecosystem together with the effect that people have on the environment are topics included in this course.  Strategies for managing ecosystems will be studied.  Laboratory activities such as soil studies and field trips to ecosystems will be included.
The theory of evolution will be studied in this course as well.  Evolution explains how organisms change over time and provides a unifying theme for understanding the history of life on earth.

 

 

MSE 621

Atoms and Their Interaction (3)

The goal of this course is to review basic ideas about matter and energy. The physical and chemical properties of matter are examined by means of physical measurements and observations. The teachers will develop and understanding of why diverse materials have the properties they do based on the atomic model. The three states of matter (solid, liquid, gas) and the physical changes which will take place between them (evaporation, condensation, freezing, boiling) as well as the formation and separation of mixtures are explored in the context of heat energy and molecular motion. Chemical changes and the transformation of chemical energy into other forms of energy are introduced. Practical chemical changes included the burning of fossil fuels and other processes which convert chemical energy into other useful forms. The structure of the atom and the arrangement of electrons determining the chemical/physical properties are explored. The physical and chemical properties of water, including acids and bases are examined in detail. Finally the atomic nucleus and nuclear changes are introduced and nuclear energy is contrasted with other energy sources. All topics are placed in a societal context.

 

 

MSE 630

Atmosphere and Weather (3)

Topics covered include the atmosphere surrounding the earth, how energy from the sun interacts with the earth and the atmosphere to produce the weather patterns we experience, and the effects of the weather on our environment.  Activities involve how to take advantage of current technology to utilize information from the weather channel and other resources, and how to best utilize information easily available from newspapers and local weather forecasts.

 

 

MSE 640

Electricity, Magnetism, and Waves (3)

Presented are the fundamental principles of electricity, magnetism and wave motion, and the history of the roles and conceptual understanding of electricity and magnetism in our civilization to date. Included will be practical activities for students to experience the concepts and uses of these phenomena. Teachers will be introduced to a number of practical, engaging and low cost ways for their own students to work with electricity, magnetism and waves.

 

 

MSE 691

Foundations of Science, Content Integration & Research Proposal  (3)

Introduction to the nature of science and the scientific method.  Activities and projects in which the students reflect on how observation, experimentation, the formulation of hypotheses and experimental design, data gathering and analysis, the formulation of models and theories, and the ability to make predictions have a role in explaining the universe.  Students research the contribution of diverse cultures to science by exploring the history of science and discovering how science and technology are related to the social and economic environment.  Ethical issues faced by scientists will be explored.  A project-based approach, using collaborative teams in which students construct their own knowledge, is used throughout this course. 
Prerequisite: 24 credits.

 

 

MSE 692 

Project Seminar (3)

A student-driven course with faculty members acting as an advisory committee for the selection and evaluation of action research done for the master project.  The action research project usually requires the student to plan instruction based on the prior knowledge and conceptualizations of middle-school or elementary students and on the application of current research on childhood and adolescent learning in science.  The project will use this research in the development of classroom experiences that promote the use of science processes and problem-solving skills.  When applicable, a variety of instructional strategies, curriculum materials, and equipment, including electronic educational technology, computers, and videos together with telecommunications are to be used. Data is collected throughout the academic year for analysis and  the information is then synthesized for formal presentation using Power-Point technology.
Prerequisite: Completion of MSE691.